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Anti-Racism Resources

About this guide

This guide attempts to provide general information and a starting point to learn about anti-racism, inclusion, and privilege, as well as provide knowledge and resources (thank you to Framingham State Library for this language). The Centrailia College community is welcome to suggest resources, guides, or any other information relevant to this guide by emailing librarian@centralia.edu. We also welcome purchase requests for books and films with anti-racist themes.

What is Anti-Racism?

"Anti-racism is the active process of identifying and eliminating racism by changing systems, organizational structures, policies and practices and attitudes, so that power is redistributed and shared equitably." - NAC International Perspectives: Women and Global Solidarity

“The beauty of anti-racism is that you don't have to pretend to be free of racism to be an anti-racist. Anti-racism is the commitment to fight racism wherever you find it, including in yourself. And it's the only way forward.” —Ijeoma Oluo

Originally created by SurgeryRedesign.com. This version was adapted by Socialwork.career.

Background

Racism is prejudice plus power; anyone of any race can have/exhibit racial prejudice, but in North America, white people have the institutional power, therefore Racism is a systematized discrimination or antagonism directed against people of color based on the belief that whiteness is superior. It is insidious, systemic, devastating, and integral to understanding both the history of the United States and the everyday experiences of those of us living in this country.

Note: A common, incorrect definition of racism is the colloquial definition: “racism is prejudice against someone based on their skin color or ethnicity and can be committed by anyone.” This is NOT an accurate definition nor the one used in most anti-racist circles. It highlights individuals' thinking and actions but ignores embedded institutional and cultural systems.

Non-white folks can be agents of racism as well (particularly when acting as representatives of white-dominated systems, such as higher education) by perpetuating the notion of white superiority and using it to discriminate against other people of color. For example, a black manager at a company may insist that a black employee's natural hair looks "unprofessional," or an Asian professor may knock points off the presentation grade of a Latinx student who speaks with an accent.

Adapted from Simmons Anti-Racism LibGuide

Acknowledgement

We would like to thank Caitlan Maxwell, Emily Spracklin, and Abby Koehler of Western Washington University for allowing use and adaptation of their guide Anti-Racism Resources.   

Creative Commons License
The content of these guides, unless otherwise noted, by Kirk Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.